Timetable

Click on the presenters for more information

09:00
09:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
13:00
13:30
14:00
14:30
15:00
15:30
16:00
16:30
17:00
17:30
18:00
18:30
19:00
19:30
20:00
20:30
21:00
Sunday 2nd
Sunday 2nd
Sunday 2nd
12pm Registration
12:00 - 14:30
Registration for ESTA 2023
12pm Registration

Paul Rolland, my teacher
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Joanne May
Paul Rolland, my teacher

Presenter Joanne May

Abstract

“Paul Rolland was the first to use science-based research to consider the role of movement in the acquisition of stringed-instrument performance technique. His movement-centered approach has had world-wide influence in the teaching of children to play stringed instruments.” This quote is written on a plaque placed prominently at the entrance to the Music Building at the University of Illinois. As a student of Paul Rolland, I would add that his influence also impacts the promotion of good health practices in string performers to prevent pain, and to play with a beauty of tone that can only be achieved, as Professor Rolland often said, “by playing free from excessive tension.”

I have three main goals:

1. To bring an understanding of Rolland’s “Principles of Movement” through whole-body actions

2. To bring an understanding of the process through which he created success for every learner by imagery, games, and actions that are fun for beginners and advancing players

3. To tell personal stories of my experiences as a student of Paul Rolland, how his inspiration created a desire in me to care for my students, and how teachers everywhere can change the world, one child at a time.

Viola Concertos and Solo Viola by Turkish Composers
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Barış Kerem
Viola Concertos and Solo Viola by Turkish Composers

Presenter: Barış Kerem

Abstract

The foundations of conservatories providing music education in Turkey are based on Darülelhan and Darülbedayi, which were established in 1914 during the Ottoman Empire. Darülelhan, who gave music education for a short time, was restructured in 1925 after the establishment of the Republic and renamed the Istanbul Conservatory.

The institution, which was connected to the municipality in 1944, was connected to the university in 1986 and took the name of Istanbul University State Conservatory. After the foundation of the Republic, important steps were taken for the development of music education and performance in Turkey.

Ankara Conservatory was opened under the guidance of Paul Hindemith, who was invited to Ankara. Many important artists continue to be trained in the institution, which was attached to Hacettepe University in 1982. In the first years of the Republic, some specially selected talented people were sent abroad to receive music education.

Ahmet Adnan Saygun and Necil Kazım Akses, who can be counted among these names, composed important works for the viola repertoire. In this study, viola concertos and solo viola works composed by Turkish composers, which are included in the curriculum of institutions determined among the conservatories that provide music education in Turkey, are discussed.

Thanks to this research, it is aimed to both recognize the works discussed by larger audiences and encourage them to be performed more frequently.

15:10 - 15:20

Making Music Beyond the Sound Barrier
15:20 - 16:10
Presenters: Dr Lara James and Gaelen McCormick
Making Music Beyond the Sound Barrier

Presenters: Dr Lara James and Gaelen McCormick

Dr Lara James (violinist, Pate’s Grammar School and Cheltenham College, UK) and Professor Gaelen McCormick (double bassist, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, USA) will address issues surrounding hearing loss and music, from their perspective of performing and teaching as musicians with a hearing impairment.

They will speak about the bias they face(d) in the field of music, and some strategies and tools for hearing they have developed. These include concepts such as proprioception, sympathetic vibration, and resonance of a room, tools that are useful to musicians regardless of hearing state.

They will share about the types of hearing devices that can help a musician with a hearing loss to enjoy music-making.

By speaking about their own experiences of hearing loss and the barriers they have had to work with, they aim to break down some of the stigmas endured by musicians with hearing loss and promote a more inclusive attitude.

After an initial presentation, we welcome a diverse discussion with attendees

Body Mapping for String Teachers
15:20 - 16:10
Presenters: Alison Wells and Ásdís Valdimarsdóttir
Body Mapping for String Teachers

Presenters: Alison Wells and Ásdís Valdimarsdóttir

Abstract

“Introduction to Body Mapping for String Teachers” Alison Wells – Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, UK Asdis Valdimarsdottir – Royal Conservatoire, The Hague, Netherlands 90-minute lecture introducing the potential of Body Mapping as a powerful basis in pedagogy. 2 main focus areas – the balanced body, and free use of the arm/shoulder region.

What is Body Mapping? Body Mapping is a method that trains musicians to move according to the true anatomical design of their body. Identifying and correcting misconceptions about how the body is structured increases facility and avoids injury.

Why is it important?

  • Alarmingly high numbers of musicians suffer from musculoskeletal pain. Body Mapping provides an effective way to gain awareness of accurate anatomical structure and movement, thereby preventing injury.
  • Musicians can practice for many hours but not feel free. Ensuing frustration can be detrimental to self-confidence, affecting performance.
  • Quality of movement is essential for the integrity of sound. Body Mapping provides an anatomical underpinning for understanding our balance and movement. Who benefits?
  • Teachers gain invaluable information for their pedagogical practice. Body Mapping provides an anatomical foundation for healthy technical development.
  • Students gain an accurate anatomical reference as they grow their skills.
  • Performers benefit from increased freedom and facility through somatic awareness.

Break
16:10 - 16:40
Break

Have a cuppa and a chat

Fiddle Gateway
16:40 - 17:40
Bojan Cvetrežnik
Fiddle Gateway

Abstract

This presentation aims at acknowledging the vast and rich diversity of European violin folk music and its relevance for a balanced and diverse violin education. By introducing some of the unique educational tools of folk violin traditions such as oral transmission, peer-to-peer learning and jamming we want to explore the benefits that can come with studying the violin with a folk approach alongside the classical or jazz violin educational path. In the first edition of the Fiddle Gateway conference that took place in Germany in 2022, a group of folk violinists from across Europe came together to discuss the minimum standard folk repertoire for teaching a certain style of folk music. The focus of discussion was, to introduce the folk styles into established classical and jazz education and to build a more solid basis for a folk violin curriculum that can be used as a point of reference. Part of the project is to establish a web database of repertoire that enables players across Europe to identify common repertoire and to find out what is the standard folk repertoire for any violin lessons. Another aim is to identify different aspects of the violin technique that can be practiced in an efficient way by playing folk tunes. In this presentation we want to present some of the findings of the Fiddle Gateway conference.

Free time/Dinner
17:40 - 19:00
Free time/Dinner

Welcome Drinks reception
19:00 - 19:45
Welcome Drinks reception

Concert: RWCMD Faculty Staff
19:45 - 21:00
Concert: RWCMD Faculty Staff

Monday 3rd
Monday 3rd
Monday 3rd
Presidents Meeting
09:00 - 11:00
Presidents Meeting

Supportive Environments
09:00 - 09:40
Presenters: Karin Hendricks and Tawnya Smith
Supportive Environments

Presenters: Karin Hendricks and Tawnya Smith

Overly self-conscious thoughts can lead to anxiety and interfere with musical development and success. It is helpful for performers to learn approaches and practices which help them to manage thoughts.

However, it is even more essential for teachers to help students develop positive mindsets to facilitate productive practice habits before negative thoughts and behaviors take hold. In this session we discuss research-based strategies for managing fears and turning negative thought patterns into confidence-boosting affirmations and practices.

The session is geared toward practicing performers, teachers, and students who wish to learn new habits of mind and ways of promoting supportive and productive rehearsal environments (e.g., ensembles, studio lessons, student practice sessions). In connection with the conference theme, our session draws upon critical pedagogy and nonviolent communication principles to address how teachers might foster supportive rehearsal spaces. Here, instructors model and teach effective communication skills to facilitate effective performance, while also recognizing and embracing diverse values, perspectives, and musical interpretations.

Throughout the session we will also engage in interactive, embodied relaxation activities to apply principles in practice. Audience members will be invited to participate in these activities at their individual level of comfort.

Alternative Strings
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Chris Haigh
Alternative Strings

Presenter: Chris Haigh

The ARCO Project was founded in 2015 by Dr Louise Lansdown, Head of Strings at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire (RBC) along with staff and students from the strings department. ARCO has evolved over the past seven years, and now boasts two projects, based in South Africa and India.

The inaugural project started as an online string teaching project between RBC and the Morris Isaacson Centre for Music, Soweto, South Africa, and in 2021 ARCO India was formalised, seeing RBC collaborate with the A.R Rahman Foundation and the Sunshine Orchestra based in Chennai.

This talk will outline each project briefly, but, focus on the challenges teaching online in non-Western cultures, choice of repertoire, communication and teacher-student dynamics and expectations.

09:40 - 09:50

09:40 - 09:50

20th Century Music
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Cécile Broché
20th Century Music

20th Century Music to Celebrate Diversity

Presenter: Cécile Broché

Cécile Broché is a Belgian based violinist and composer. After graduation from Belgian conservatories in classical and contemporary music she completed her studies in Paris, in a jazz school.

Her large education and experience led her to develop her musical activities worldwide. It includes collaboration with Frederic Rzewski, Garrett List, Barre Philips, Paolo Fresu, among others.

She works as a composer for theater, dance and music performances. She has been performed at Festival Art Musica (Brussels), Festival Bauhaus (Berlin), Cité des Arts (Paris), Festival Roulette (NewYork), Morelia Festival of music (Mexico) She appears on a few dozen CDs, including 4 CDs as a leader with her own music.

Diversity from the Inside Out
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Chenoa Murphy
Diversity from the Inside Out

Presenter: Chenoa Murphy

Diversity From the Inside Out was birthed out of my initial course “Introduction to Black Classical Composers & Musicians as an answer to questions from string teachers (who took the course) such as “What can I do to diversify my studio?” “How can I introduce music by black composers in a way that brings dignity to them?” “How can I raise money for scholarships for children of color who can’t afford music lessons?” or statements such as “I’m afraid of making a mistake or saying the wrong thing” or “I’m afraid of causing more harm in my quest to become a racial ally.”

While all these questions and statements are noble and good at face value, they don’t address the deeper more obvious question, the most important question which is “What am I doing as a music teacher that is preventing me from having a diverse studio?” This presentation will answer that question. It is possible that certain thoughts and beliefs that are held by the music teacher could be preventing you from having the diverse studio you desire.

Break
10:30 - 11:00
Have a cuppa and a chat
Break

Performing Jolivet’s Cinq églogues and Hersant’s Pavane
11:00 - 11:40
Presenters: Caroline Rae and Charles Bodman Whittaker (viola)
Performing Jolivet’s Cinq églogues and Hersant’s Pavane

Presenters: Caroline Rae and Charles Bodman Whittaker (viola)

Caroline Rae
Charles Bodman Whittaker 

As the viola rose to prominence as a virtuoso solo instrument during the last hundred years or so, the importance of British players and composers has long been recognised, but an equally renowned parallel French tradition has been less widely acknowledged, at least in the UK. With the appointment in 1894 of Théophile Laforge as the Paris Conservatoire’s first professor of viola, followed by that of his pupil and successor Maurice Vieux in 1918, a school of French viola playing was established that catalysed a host of new repertoire.

This presentation explores two works belonging to this distinguished French tradition that were composed for, and inspired by, two of the most eminent French violists of modern times; André Jolivet’s Cinq églogues (1967) written for the late Serge Collot and Philippe Hersant’s Pavane (1987) written for Gérard Caussé. Descendants of Vieux’s teaching at the Paris Conservatoire, both Collot and Caussé established international reputations as champions of new music.

André Jolivet (1905-1974) composed a significant body of music for strings over a period of more than forty years that includes a set of experimental works written in the 1960s forunaccompanied viola, violin and cello. The Cinq églogues for solo viola is a substantial, five-movement, virtuosic work thatdistils many features of Jolivet’s late style. Although often overlooked, it ranks among the most significant contributions to the solo viola repertoire after Hindemith. Philippe Hersant (b.1948), a former student of Jolivet, has also written many works for strings including quartets and concertos as well as solo works for viola, several for Gérard Caussé.

The Pavane was inspired by the music of the Scottish viola da gamba player Tobias Hume and evokes the melancholy of the processional dance through exploring a range of expressive dissonances and acoustic effects. Supported with live illustrations performed by Charles Bodman Whittaker, this talk investigates these works from a performer’s perspective through considering issues of technique, notation, gesture, expressivity, language and style, and concludes with a complete performance of Hersant’s Pavane (8 minutes).

Recruitment and Retention of Minoritised Ethnic String Students
11:00 - 11:40
Presenter: Maureen Yuen
Recruitment and Retention of Minoritised Ethnic String Students

Presenter: Maureen Yuen

For string professors who have a genuine desire to increase minoritised ethnic (ME) representation in their studios. Minoritised ethnic students are underrepresented in applied music studios in universities even as they are increasingly participating in primary and secondary music programs.

Possible reasons for this discrepancy may include

(1) systematic racism in the arts, (2) a lack of institutional support for minoritized students, and (3) a lack of a “critical mass” of minoritised ethnic students in music programs to support and attract additional minoritised ethnic students. The purpose of this workshop is to help participants self-reflect on their own cultural programming, implicit biases, and blind spots.

Participants will explore the dominance of Western European cultural programming and its impact on the participation and retention of minority ethnic students in string study at the university level.

11:40 - 11:50

André Jolivet's Music for Strings
11:50 - 12:10
Presenter: Caroline Rae
André Jolivet's Music for Strings

Presenter: Caroline Rae

André Jolivet (1905-1974) was among the most significant French composers of the twentieth century. A pupil of Varèse and colleague of Messiaen in La Jeune France, Jolivet forged an innovative new musical language during the 1930s that influenced both Messiaen and Boulez.

After a period of stylistic re-orientation during World War Two, Jolivet reasserted his compositional raison d’être in 1946 as restoring ‘music’s ancient original meaning when it was the magic and incantatory expression of the sacred in human communities’, a humanist approach that infused most of his subsequent music. While Jolivet is best known for his orchestral works and chamber music for piano and for flute, he also authored a significant body of music for strings from the 1930s to his final years.

While his early violin works were written for the violinist Martine Barbillon, the composer’s first wife, it was his String Trio and String Quartet – comprising an expressive atonalism akin to Berg – that first attracted the admiration of Messiaen. Jolivet’s works for cello include solo pieces as well as two Concertos of the 1960s commissioned by André Navarra and Mstislav Rostropovich, respectively. Jolivet’s Violin Concerto, one of his last completed works, was intended for Leonid Kogan.

Additionally, Jolivet composed a series of unaccompanied experimental works as well as works for string orchestra, these representing some of his most personal musical statements. This paper contextualises these undeservedly neglected works to highlight their importance within the twentieth-century string repertoire and, hopefully, encourage future performances.

12:10 - 12:30

12:10 - 13:00

Lunchtime concert
13:00 - 13:30
Cardiff County and Vale of Glamorgan Youth Chamber Orchestra
Lunchtime concert

Exhibitors/Lunch
13:30 - 14:30
Exhibitors/Lunch

Techniques from around the world
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Julie Lieberman
Techniques from around the world

Presenter: Julie Lieberman

Each bowed string genre offers a unique approach to listening and playing. The underlying rhythms, harmonic changes, ornamentation, and varying perspectives on how a tune is individualized present diverse technical and musical challenges.

Some styles require improvisatory skills—from simple to quite complex—and/or the ability to generate melodic variations that are true to the style. This participatory session will provide an overview of the skills required as well as suggested approaches to providing your students with a hands-on appreciation for the musical imagination of the world.

Student Violin Concertos
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Ines Tomić
Student Violin Concertos

Presenter: Ines Tomić

Violin Concertos are one of the most important parts of the students' repertoire. Students love them because of their musicallity, most advanced that they've reached that far but also for the challenge they make with their length and difficulty.

But how to choose the right Concerto for each student, what elements should be considered, what outcomes we want to reach and how to get there? Answers to these and some other questions Mrs. Tomić gives in her presentation Student Violin Concertos. Also, in the short technical and musical analysis, she talks about the most famous student concertos (by Kuechler, Rieding, Seitz, Accolay, and Beriot), and gives them additional context with composers' biographies.

She makes an overview of Dorothy DeLay's Violin Concerto sequence and all participants will be gifted with a practical list of all students' violin concertos listed in order of difficulty level.

15:10 - 15:20

Getting to know the Galician fiddle
15:20 - 16:10
Presenters: Rosa Pampillo and Susana Blanco
Getting to know the Galician fiddle

Getting to know the fiddle through Galician rhythms and dances

Presenters: Rosa Pampillo and Susana Blanco

The first edition of San Simón Fiddle Camp took place in July, 2012 in San Simón Island (Redondela, Galicia). The course started as a summer fiddle camp where students between 8-18 could learn Galician traditional music and fiddle techniques.

In 2015 started Encordass, a summer fiddle course for adults. In both courses, students can enjoy a week in a natural environment where they can take part in musical, artistic and recreational activities developed from an ecological perspective. In 2016 these courses started to take a different path.

Galicia Fiddle Cultural Association developed a journey outlined by transnational and mobility processes with students and outstanding musicians from the Spanish and international music scene, creating an expansive route from Galicia to Europe, America, Africa and Asia This is the context of my ethnomusicological study, which is focused on the planetary dynamics around the fiddle in southern Galicia in the last twenty years.

These events could be analysed through the concept of Planetarism and Artivism. In order to realise this study, I used the ethnographic method through participant observation in concerts, festivals, courses and conferences around the fiddle in Galicia, Barcelona, Madrid and Scotland.

History of the Bowed Electric String
15:20 - 16:10
Presenter: Benedict Heaney
History of the Bowed Electric String

Presenter: Benedict Heaney

How & why the Electric Violin Family came to be. Who made what, where and when. This is absolutely extraordinary story is made all the more incredible because it is told here for the first time.

Certainly, after the 1950s, those picking up the quest for an ideal electrified violin are pursuing a path maybe less trodden but nonetheless already cleared. The fetters have been snapped from the art of music. These instruments mark an absolutely new epoch in music as well as in musical instruments.

The contemporary researcher compared to one just a few years ago has a vastly enriched database of material to search and draw from to focus their study: on the people, events, places and times that matter. As can readily be found, there are instances of players, makers of instruments and composers working with electric violin stating they were the first to do so.

Assumedly, mostly made in honesty, the claimant having searched around available sources found nothing of note to contradict, and simply a wrong conclusion was drawn. Such are the resources available today however proof is readily found that a case for an electronically adjusted ("Electric") Violin was made long ago.

Break
16:10 - 16:40
Break

Have a cuppa and a chat

Masterclass: Clifton Harrison
16:40 - 18:00
Masterclass: Clifton Harrison
Masterclass: Clifton Harrison

Masterclass: Clifton Harrison

Masterclass: David Stark
16:40 - 18:00
Masterclass: David Stark
Masterclass: David Stark

Masterclass: David Stark

Free time/Dinner
18:00 - 19:45
Free time/Dinner

Concert: Bojan Cvetrežnik
19:45 - 21:00
Concert: Bojan Cvetrežnik

Tuesday 4th
Tuesday 4th
Tuesday 4th
Awareness through Movement
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Josephine Horder
Awareness through Movement

Presenter: Josephine Horder

Diversity, the uniqueness of the individual, a person’s potential for growth and improvement - these values are central to the Feldenkrais Method®. In the context of string teaching this means finding creative, individuated approaches to the myriad variations of physical build, coordination, facility, aptitude, learning style, and motivation that we are likely to meet in our students.

As string teachers we may nurture an image of the ideal way to manipulate our instrument and bow but may find ourselves confronted by, for example, a double jointed thumb, a teenager with scoliosis or a late-starter with arthritic fingers. Do we try to fit these people to our ideal or do we look for novel and inventive strategies to help them function optimally in relation to their specific needs so that they can feel supported as unique individuals with the potential to improve?

A physicist, engineer and judo exponent, Dr Moshe Feldenkrais helped people to discover their potential for growth and development, whatever their situation and aspirations, through a free-ranging exploration and investigation process called Awareness Through Movement®. He worked with the plasticity of the brain and our limitless ability to learn, change and improve. It is through creative exploration and an inventive ‘thinking-outside-the-box’ approach to problem solving that the Feldenkrais Method® can inform and enrich string teaching.

I propose to present an introductory 40 minute workshop in which delegates will have an interactive experience of an Awareness Through Movement® lesson with clear application to string playing.

CT Scan as a Diagnostic Tool for String Instruments
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Frank Pameijer
CT Scan as a Diagnostic Tool for String Instruments

Presenter: Frank Pameijer

In 2017, a cello presumably from around 1760 was lent to Dutch cellist Joachim Eijlander. He immediately fell in love with the sound. However, nothing was known about it. Joachim had many questions: Who built the cello, when and where? Did it have internal damage and/or restorations?

In search of answers, Joachim needed a CT scan of the cello for specialists luthiers evaluation. Because some holes were visible on the surface, he was worried about woodworm damage Since I am cellist but also radiologist, we scanned the cello at my hospital. The CT supplied adequate answers to Joachim’s questions. The encounter has resulted in “Music&Science”. In Medicine, CT-scans are used to ‘look inside the body without opening it’.

This can also be done with string instruments (Sirr and Waddle, Radiographics 1999; 19:639-646). In Music&Science, the analogy between human anatomy and ‘cello anatomy’ is discussed. Examples are shown of CT-scans showing (hidden) internal damage such as woodworm and (unexpected) restorations. Joachim Eijlander’s quest for the origin of his cello is also presented.

At the end, the audience travels (8 min.) through the interior of the ‘Eijlander’ cello watching a 3D ‘medical’ animation while listening to live (cello) music.

09:40 - 09:50

Multi-Cultural Music for the Youngest Violinist
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Crystal Boyack
Multi-Cultural Music for the Youngest Violinist

Presenter: Crystal Boyack

Beginning violinists deserve great music too. This session will present melodies from around the world that have been carefully selected for the beginning violinist to prepare them for Twinkle.

These songs build foundational technique including posture, violin seat, left hand position, bow hold, bow stroke, string crossings and placing fingers. They are are not only technically enriching but also musically and culturally enriching- containing songs in many tonalities and meters and from many cultures.

Using these songs creates a technically sound violinist ready for level one music, as well as a violinist with a rich repertoire of world music.

ARCO: A tri-continental collaboration
09:50 - 10:30
A Tri-Continental String Teaching and Learning Collaboration
ARCO: A tri-continental collaboration

Presenter: Louise Lansdown

The ARCO Project was founded in 2015 by Dr Louise Lansdown, Head of Strings at the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire (RBC) along with staff and students from the strings department. ARCO has evolved over the past seven years, and now boasts two projects, based in South Africa and India.

The inaugural project started as an online string teaching project between RBC and the Morris Isaacson Centre for Music, Soweto, South Africa, and in 2021 ARCO India was formalised, seeing RBC collaborate with the A.R Rahman Foundation and the Sunshine Orchestra based in Chennai.

This talk will outline each project briefly, but, focus on the challenges teaching online in non-Western cultures, choice of repertoire, communication and teacher-student dynamics and expectations.

Break
10:30 - 11:00
Have a cuppa and a chat
Break

Pioneering Female Cello and Double Bass Teachers
11:00 - 11:40
Presenters: Gaelen McCormick and Miranda Wilson
Pioneering Female Cello and Double Bass Teachers

Presenters: Gaelen McCormick and Miranda Wilson

Abstract

In the present day, thousands of women play and teach the cello professionally. But as recently as a hundred years ago, this was not the case. In the nineteenth century, many considered the cello an unladylike instrument for women.

Once the use of the tailpin became widespread, it did become easier to play the cello in the voluminous skirts of the time. There were, however, other obstacles to overcome, such as gender-based discrimination, societal disapproval of working women, and critics who commented more on women cellists’ appearance than on their musicianship.

Women’s contributions to music education have always been significant, but when it came to top professorships, women were often passed over in favour of men. It wasn’t until the 1920s that a woman, Edwige Bergeron, won a cello professorship at a major conservatory, the Schola Cantorum in Paris. And yet, women cello pedagogues persisted in breaking down barriers for themselves and other women in music. In the twentieth century, women created important schools of cello playing in America, Asia, Australasia, Europe, and the former Soviet bloc.

This presentation will focus on the pedagogy of three internationally-renowned women cello pedagogues: Margaret Rowell, Joan Dickson, and Phyllis Young. For each, I will discuss their careers and approaches to teaching foundations, left-hand techniques, right-hand techniques, and musical expression.
Participants in this session will receive handouts about these three trailblazing women cello pedagogues, the challenges they faced, and their pedagogical legacies. This will include a summary of their pedagogical approaches, and the practical applications of those approaches for present-day string educators.

Women double bassists are disproportionately under-represented on stage and in the teaching studio. Historically this instrument was deemed so physically demanding that players were recruited on the basis of strength and height, with less regard to musical ability. Thankfully with the advent and modernization of methods, the improvement in the production of strings, and the ergonomic design of instruments, the double bass is available to all body types and all genders.

These substantial changes in equipment and setup did not become a reality until the mid-20th century. The rise of female teachers of the double bass correlates to this change. There are no historic female pedagogues to share with this presentation, and instead we will focus on four selected women who are currently active in the teaching world: Cathy Elliott (London), Caroline Emery (London), Susan Hagen (Boston), and Orin O’Brien (New York).

In this presentation we will learn about the technical approach these teachers use, and the successes they have found in teaching very young players – in the case of Elliott and Emery - and in teaching the emerging professional player – in the case of Hagen and O’Brien. We will also discuss what the representation of women as teachers and performers means in the double bass world.

Improvisation and Composition Games
11:00 - 11:40
Presenter: Christian Howes
Improvisation and Composition Games

Presenter: Christian Howes

Using cue cards and a system of hand signals, Christian conducts a large ensemble in “free” improvisation. With two systems at play, the "number " and "free note" system, participants engage in call and response, looping, "musical wrestling", vamps, modal grooves, musical chaos, with many stylistic applications.

Your students can be taught to “conduct" the improvising ensemble. AKA "conduction", is a relatively popular practice among contemporary ensembles worldwide, including small groups and even orchestras. Christian's approach borrows from a variety of sources and caters to the skill set of classically trained string players.

1) The number system indicates pitches. (the conductor gives the hand signal with one hand and cues entrance with the other)

2) The "free note" system is cued by the conductor indicating free note.

3) The conductor designates an individual or group with each cue. This allows for music to be created through "design" by conductor and improvisation by players.

4) C cards contain various instructions

11:40 - 11:50

11:50 - 13:00

Lunchtime concert: Simmy Singh
13:00 - 13:30
Lunchtime concert
Lunchtime concert: Simmy Singh
Exhibitors/Lunch
13:30 - 14:30
Exhibitors/Lunch

Playing Healthy
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Julie Lieberman
Playing Healthy

Presenter: Julie Lieberman

Each bowed string genre offers a unique approach to listening and playing. The underlying rhythms, harmonic changes, ornamentation, and varying perspectives on how a tune is individualized present diverse technical and musical challenges.

Some styles require improvisatory skills—from simple to quite complex—and/or the ability to generate melodic variations that are true to the style. This participatory session will provide an overview of the skills required as well as suggested approaches to providing your students with a hands-on appreciation for the musical imagination of the world.

Chamber Music at an Early Learning Stage
14:30 - 15:10
Presenters: Lidija Grkman and Špela Kermelj
Chamber Music at an Early Learning Stage

Dance, Creativity and Cultural Heritage

Presenters: Lidija Grkman and Špela Kermelj

Our presentation will introduce the importance of playing chamber music at an early learning stage, presented in our new textbook of chamber music for string players Veselo glasbeno rajanje pod lipo ali 1. Letni zmajčkov ples, which encourages pupils to learn string technique by making music with enthusiasm.

Our work is guided by a key principle: “Playing music in a group among friends is the greatest happiness and a gift, a unique experience, incomparable to any other activity.”

With our textbook, we wish to open the door to the experienced and emotional world of chamber music for young people. We hope this will encourage them to develop their own creativity through music, which leaves an indelible mark on children’s personalities and influences their adult lives.

We chose as the theme of our textbook the dance music, which is the oldest form of instrumental music, with characteristic of the long-standing diversity provided by different influences as a result of geographical and historical events. Instrumental melodies of folk dances and dance songs dating from the 17th to the 19th centuries are linked to a particular dance step, providing important lessons on the precision of rhythm, synchronised articulation, breathing and sound culture. These requirements rely on the fundamentals of bowing technique, which are shown in the textbook in different ways: using detaché, legato, staccato, portato, string crossing, col legno, and others, organised around the principles of performing dance music.The textbook encourages the pupil to develop their own creativity and offers a playful and effortless way of learning the basic string skills that are essential to mastering the instrument, all whilst raising awareness of the importance of nurturing cultural heritage.

15:10 - 15:20

Embracing New Notation Systems
15:20 - 16:10
Introducing ColourTAB
Embracing New Notation Systems

Presenter: Georgina Leach

Many young musicians (and adults!) find western staff notation intimidating and difficult to understand. This can act as a barrier to learning as children struggle to ‘translate’ unfamiliar symbols whilst simultaneously grappling with the myriad technical demands of the violin.

An initially enthusiastic student can quickly become discouraged and disengaged. To survive in today’s climate, musicians need to be flexible and adaptable. I often work with artists who have had no formal education in Music (yet in some cases have a wall full of gold records!).

Being a confident improviser who can arrange on the fly and play from lead sheets/by ear has given me access to some fabulously diverse music-making opportunities and allowed me to carve out my own niche. From the aural tradition underpinning the Suzuki method, to reciting bols in Indian music, from guitar TAB, Kodaly’s Solfa, to ABC Notation in Irish trad and ‘gamified’ tutorials on YouTube, there are many ways for students to access musical learning.

Why are we so obsessed with Western Classical-centric staff notation? Surely there other notation systems and approaches to learning worthy of exploration that will not only broaden our students’ experience, but enkindle a profound love of learning and may serve their needs better.

Chop Notation Project
15:20 - 16:10
Presenter: Oriol Sana
Chop Notation Project

Presenter: Oriol Sana

The Chop Notation Project, chopping is over fifty years in the making. Although previous notation systems have been developed by Richard Greene (chop’s inventor) and Darol Anger (through his work with Turtle Island String Quartet), the technique has developed beyond what those systems can communicate.

This project is an effort to bring the notation system up to date with current playing styles in order to facilitate communication of the technique between players, composers, and educators.

Of all of the amazing new timbres and string techniques that have emerged since the music of Bela Bartok, chopping stands as one of the most universal and potentially transformative developments.

No other extended technique has been so broadly incorporated into as many genres, or has become such an increasingly necessary part of our pedagogy and professional vocabulary. In this workshop we will work different styles with this technique such as Reggae, Rock, Swing, Bluegrass and Funk.

Break
16:10 - 16:40
Break

Have a cuppa and a chat

Delegates Meeting
16:40 - 18:10
Delegates Meeting

Expanding musical horizons
16:40 - 17:40
Championing diversity in teaching and learning
Expanding musical horizons

With a global reach, ABRSM syllabuses have a unique role to play in championing music's rich diversity. This panel discussion will explore how ABRSM works with a diverse range of organisations, communities and composers to broaden the music that it commissions and publishes, told through the lens of its composer mentoring programme and with a sneak preview of the forthcoming Bowed Strings syllabus. The panel will discuss what we mean by diversity of repertoire, the power of working in partnership, and the role that the teaching community can play in expanding our learners' musical horizons

17:40 - 17:50

ABRSM Showcase Concert
17:50 - 18:20
More info to follow
ABRSM Showcase Concert

Free time/Dinner
18:20 - 19:45
Free time/Dinner

Concert: The Ayoub Sisters
19:45 - 21:00
Concert: The Ayoub Sisters

Wednesday 5th
Wednesday 5th
Wednesday 5th
Scottish Whispers
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Morag Johnston
Scottish Whispers

Presenter: Morag Johnston

Scottish Whispers is a learning strategy I developed to enable musicians to learn by ear and perform from memory. It is an effective research-based series of activities where the learner plays an active role in the learning process.

Scottish Whispers is based on current research into how the brain works and its effect on learning as well as the aural tradition I grew up in. For ESTA 2023, I propose a forty-minute workshop where participants learn a tune with me using the method. Participants would leave with having a folk tune they learnt by ear and knowledge of the stylistic aspects of the tune including bowings and ornaments.

In addition, they will have experienced the Scottish Whispers method and learnt how to teach the method to others (with ideas how to modify it for different audiences). Although research shows that ear playing is beneficial for musicians, it is a skill that many find difficult to do and teach.

I grew up in the Shetland Isles where the violin and the aural tradition are key elements of traditional island culture. Now a professional classical musician, I developed this method after witnessing colleagues finding learning by ear and memorising intimidating and frustrating.

Exploring the Joy in Violin Teaching
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Lauri Hämäläinen
Exploring the Joy in Violin Teaching

Presenter: Lauri Hämäläinen

DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF STRING TEACHING I would like to organize an interactive discussion and debate about about values, practicing and principles of meaningful music learning for diverse students.

We will approach eight fundamental pedagogical topics by debate and playing together. Bring your own instrument!

  • 1 The heartbeat and meaning of life
  • 2. The power of mental images in the learning process play the Famous Musicians
  • 3. Ski Jumping and violin playing. ”Circle of positive positivity”
  • 4. Movements to create joy and the Marathon movement
  • 5. The impotartace of bio-feedback and balance
  • 6. The seven samurai bow-exercise
  • 7. Practising, inner motivation and late game brilliance
  • 8. Joy of life. To share moments. To share moments with Music. The Harry Potter quote.

The aim is to give all participants real tools for understanding diverse students and teaching techniques.

Please remember to bring your own instruments

09:40 - 09:50

The Lost Art of Classical Music Improvisation
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Rupert Guenther
The Lost Art of Classical Music Improvisation

Presenter: Rupert Guenther

A new breakthrough approach to improvisation, which allows classical musicians without any previous improvisation experience to very quickly begin to give wings to their own feelings, ideas and life experience, and improvise their own original classical music, in much the same way that a painter creates pictures of the imagination onto a blank canvas.

It is worth noting that this approach differs radically from other popular notions of improvisation in classical music practice, such as extemporisation which treats existing compositions as a springboard for the musician to merely add their own variations to, or jazz, which means embarking on an entirely new life-long learning discipline in order to even begin improvisation.

This approach, to the contrary, relishes in and is strengthened by all the traditional classical training, sensitivity, nuance and experience which classical players already have attained, and then adds a few simple understandings which form the basis of all music throughout time.

We find that quality improvised music made in this manner is indiscernible from the finest composed scores in its unique diversity and emotional value for both the artist and their audiences. Imagine every artist bringing music to the concert platform which no one else can offer!

Teaching from the Heart
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Nicole Melrose
Teaching from the Heart

Presenter: Nicole Melrose

This session will empower educators in their desire to implement trauma-informed practices in the string classroom and promote hope and success. We will define trauma, discuss how to recognize trauma responses, and cultivate an understanding of the impact of living with chronic trauma. The majority of our time will be spent sharing practical tools including pedagogy sequencing and approaches to make our classrooms inherently trauma-informed and inclusive.

Nicole will share practical examples from her own work with students in systemically underserved and under-resourced schools where students live with multiple intersecting traumas. Researched-based work will inform this session, as Nicole shares both practical examples and data gathered from her work, along with research around hope and resiliency.

Through a vibrant and dynamic presentation utilizing slides, video, and small group discussion, educators will learn: -

  • How to recognize trauma responses and how they correlate with the nervous system.
  • How to structure the string classroom to be supportive for students who may struggle with understanding how to regulate their trauma-responses and nervous system.
  • How the nervous system responds to sound.
  • What co-regulation is, and how to adapt co-regulation practices for the string classroom.
  • Pedagogical sequencing and approaches that positively impact learning in students with trauma
  • The long-term impact of trauma-informed practices and how they can transform the lives of students.

Educators will leave this session with practical tools and adaptive strategies to implement in the classroom that will empower both the student and teacher.

Break
10:30 - 11:00
Have a cuppa and a chat
Break

Teaching Nonverbal Communication
11:00 - 11:40
Presenter: Joanna Petrie
Teaching Nonverbal Communication

Presenter: Joanna Petrie

My project at Dundee University in 2020: ‘How can increasing the awareness and use of nonverbal communication techniques between players in school-aged string ensembles enrich teaching and learning within orchestral settings?’ showed me these skills are vital for success, are unfamiliar to many young musicians and are not always proactively taught.

I did a literature review, tested activities, then wrote a workshop for teenagers. Activities were based around facial expression, eye gaze, gesture and posture , and three outcomes – coordination, musical content and social unity .

Gesture can solve a problem more quickly than speech and encourages a sense of trust that can promote creative risk-taking. The workshop summarises these findings, includes participation in signalling and jamming games and allows input from delegates.

The games improved the sound quality, ensemble and engagement of my groups and accelerated pupils’ skills. The common language of music and gesture unites musicians of every background.

Bass Playing, that must be very difficult?
11:00 - 11:40
Presenter: Peter Leerdam
Bass Playing, that must be very difficult?

Presenter: Peter Leerdam

BASS PLAYING SEEMS TO BE VERY DIFFICULT Working as a professor of double bass at Codarts Rotterdam I have noticed that we spend so much time in correcting the student’s technique.

We try to build a proper technique with beginners or when we work with pupils from other teachers: almost everyone is afraid to play out of tune. But maybe that’s just why they do! It is definitely complicated, because there are so many elements like shifting, fingerings, articulations and bowings, etc…and quite often the tempo of progress in learning is so slow that it demotivates the student.

So we have to do something, because our youth orchestras are looking for bass players! But how to learn quicker? I have developed another way of approaching the bass which can be used next to the method the student is working with: my philosophy is that shifting positions should start from the very beginning and this will help the student to be aware of the importance of a solid left hand and also will take away the fear of playing out of tune.

Every position is two semi tones or a whole tone and therefore I work in these exercises with the chromatic and whole tone scale. Using my material will also work for jazz players who want to improve their technique and become a solid classical bassist, or cellists who would like to make a change into playing the bass…

11:40 - 12:00

12:00 - 13:00

Lunchtime concert: Jennifer Pike
13:00 - 13:30
Lunchtime concert
Lunchtime concert: Jennifer Pike
Exhibitors/Lunch
13:30 - 14:30
Exhibitors/Lunch

It’s Never too Late
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Sarah Drury
It’s Never too Late

Presenter: Sarah Drury

Diversity is very much in the news now and rightly so. However, it is very easy to focus on enabling opportunities to as wide a demographic of young people as possible whilst maybe forgetting that there are currently almost 16 million people over the age of 60 in the UK equating to some 23% of the population.

Many are very healthy, active and wish to either restart long lost hobbies or begin new ones ..such as learning a stringed instrument ! In January I began teaching at the East London Late Starters orchestra, an organisation designed for any adult who would like to play a stringed instrument but can't afford private tuition.

The emphasis is on learning in groups and playing in an ensemble from the start. In this presentation I will discuss the organisation and my varied teaching here in more detail but most importantly hopefully inspire some of you to want to set up something similar for yourselves. N.B.. By 2050 one in four adults in the UK will be over the age of 65.

Creating Inclusivity in our Early Childhood Teaching
14:30 - 15:10
Presenter: Laura Carr
Creating Inclusivity in our Early Childhood Teaching

Creating Inclusivity in our Early Childhood String Teaching

Presenter: Laura Carr

Laura formally trained at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff Wales. Upon completing her studies, she set upon her career of teaching and performing. Laura’s work in schools in Wales along with the birth of her daughters, inspired her to look at teaching from a new perspective.

Laura spent the next 10 years writing an entire curriculum of beginner resources called Stringosaurus, which continues to evolve to this day. Laura moved to Australia in 2016 and has since set up a unique school strings program with ages 4-8 at Peter Moyes Anglican Community School.

In October 2021, Laura had the privilege of presenting at the Nova Scotia Music Educators conference, Unmasking Music Education and in the same month, released her long anticipated Early Childhood Online Resources Hub, which is currently being enjoyed by string teachers and students from around the globe.

In July 2022 Laura presented at the AUSTA Melbourne conference, 'Strings of Australia' an inspiring and energetic workshop, Teachers' Toolkit for Early Childhood Teaching.

15:10 - 15:20

Cardiff Friendly Strings
15:20 - 16:10
Presenter: Phil Heyman
Cardiff Friendly Strings

Presenter: Phil Heyman

CFS is a string group for early-stage adult players; many lapsed or teachers on their second instrument (which I'm guessing would be particularly of interest to delegates at the conference). I would like to offer a free workshop playing some of the repertoire we enjoy.

Pioneering Female Violin and Viola Teachers
15:20 - 16:10
Presenter: Dijana Ihas
Pioneering Female Violin and Viola Teachers

Presenter: Dijana Ihas

This presentation will focus on the pedagogies and legacies of two internationally-renowned violin pedagogues – Dorothy DeLay and Kató Havas – and two equally renowned women viola pedagogues – Karen Tuttle and Lillian Fuchs.

Although these women left a major mark on the development of string pedagogy, their work is still less known to wider audiences. For each of these four women pedagogues, I will explain their pedagogical approaches to teaching foundations, left-hand techniques, right-hand techniques, and musical expression/interpretation/practicing with the purpose of making their pedagogies relevant to participants.

I will then summarize their legacies and explain the significance of their work. Participants in the session will receive a handout with summaries of the pedagogical points of these four women so that they can immediately apply it to their own teaching, if desired.

Moreover, participants will gain new insights into the triumphs and challenges that accompany women in the world of string pedagogy and teaching.

Break
16:10 - 16:40
Break

Have a cuppa and a chat

Masterclass: Jennifer Pike
16:40 - 18:00
Masterclass: Jennifer Pike

Free time/Dinner
18:00 - 19:45
Free time/Dinner

Gala Dinner
19:45 - 21:00
Gala Dinner

Thursday 6th
Thursday 6th
Thursday 6th
Changing the tune?
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Andrea Jones
Changing the tune?

Presenter: Andrea Jones

Over recent years the classical music industry has been under sustained scrutiny for not fully reflecting the diverse society in which we live. However, both onstage and backstage, the industry can only reflect the demographics of those young people who are seeking to enter it, thus making the education system, at all levels, a key focus for our attention.  As part of a sector wide response to tackling issues of diversity, especially post-Covid, music educators in all areas and at all stages of the education pipeline must examine their roles in this ecosystem, considering and developing their response to help support change, develop new skills, build resilience and work in new ways to fulfil creative ambitions.  

This talk will focus on some of the strategies and initiatives we are developing at RWCMD, supporting musicians entering Higher Education in a conservatoire setting and raising awareness of the diverse skills and attributes needed for success in a fast-changing sector. Recognising and developing a broader range of talent and potential through non-traditional means is one way in which we can support diversity and better bridge the gap between ‘traditional’ conservatoire training and that which audiences and practitioners are seeking.  

The role for higher music education here is crucial, as for both instrumental teachers and students a clear and up to date understanding of what is desirable and realistic to work towards for a career in music is of the utmost importance. Within our re-imagined undergraduate provision at RWCMD, attention is now given to the development of a broad range of socially informed, collaborative, entrepreneurial and robust pedagogical skills in addition to core musical practices, highlighting the importance of preparing flexible musicians who are ready in turn to play their part in tackling the challenges of building a more diverse and sustainable classical industry. Focus will also be given to how entry processes to conservatoires may evolve to reflect the diverse pre-entry musical journeys of students, and the ways in which teachers can nuance and develop their inclusive teaching practices to nurture students' preparations for a contemporary HE education. 

Exploring the Pentatonic
09:00 - 09:40
Presenter: Jessica Yuen
Exploring the Pentatonic

Presenter: Jessica Yuen

Inclusive music learning beyond European classical music. Bringing out values of oriental music: women’s oriental stories to students, with pentatonic introduction.

Learning Objectives: Diversified learning music repertories beyond the traditional classical male European composers well-known to a classically trained educator. Exploring music with a different culture, especially the oriental culture selections with pentatonic and inspiring stories about women in different historical settings and moral values.

Explore oriental repertoires and their sound. Introduction with an easy way to transcribe Chinese music notation to Western 5-lined staff arrangement. Background As a classically trained Pianist and Violinist, I realized that my formal western music studies lack inclusiveness in learning music.

Even though piano and violin are traditionally labeled as instruments from western culture, it is important to teach our next generation that music and its instrument have no borders. Introducing repertoires beyond the traditional European white male-focused composers and repertoires are necessary inclusive and diversified studies for our students to understand and explore the world of sound Musical Examples (included sample sheet music) Music from Chinese Ballet: White-haired Girl Music from Chinese poetry: Mulan Poem Music from Opera: Jasmine Flower theme as the muse for Puccini's Madame Butterfly.

09:40 - 09:50

Bach to the Future
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Simon Jones
Bach to the Future

Presenter: Simon Jones

Our understanding of the string performance style of previous eras has been shaped powerfully by the recordings of the 20th century.

This presentation aims to show how copious research and broad experimentation has changed the recording industry, honed our expectations and given us a new set of tools with which to approach repertoire from the Renaissance to the Romantic.

Learning by Ear
09:50 - 10:30
Presenter: Marianne Lie
Learning by Ear

Presenter: Marianne Lie

How can teaching aural copying create a greater degree of musical freedom within the Western classical genre? Western classical education, based in interpreting and reading scores, activates the “thinking” mind, as the auditive method activates a more embodied understanding of the music, as well as creating creative musicians.

The musical society of today have most musicians working as portfolio musicians with diversified careers. There is a need for developing skills for the musical world of today to create work relevance for today’s music students. I teach the western classical master-apprentice method, and as well the aural imitation method inspired by how jazz, folk and rock/ pop musicians learn.

The project seems to be very beneficial for the students. “It feels like the music has a shortcut to my inner self”, explained one of the students. This inner ear is also developed with the more traditional way of learning, but our aim is to develop the ear-mind-finger connection to be able to realize on your instrument what one hears in one’s head.

Time will show whether the method also naturally leads to an enhancement in the ability to listen to music and if it will facilitate a form of integrated music.

Break
10:30 - 11:00
Have a cuppa and a chat
Break

Masterclass: Guy Johnston
11:00 - 12:20
Masterclass: Guy Johnston
Masterclass: Guy Johnston

Masterclass: Guy Johnston

Lines and Loops
11:00 - 11:40
Presenter: Steve Bingham
Lines and Loops

Presenter: Steve Bingham

Eclectic live-looping violinist and educator Steve Bingham presents a solo recital like no other! Using up-to-the-minute technology he performs a diverse variety of multi-layered music - showcasing the use of looping and how it can enthuse students and diversify string teaching.

With music from Michael Nyman, Steve Reich, Mike Oldfield, Coldplay, The Pet Shop Boys, and more, and with styles ranging from minimalism and folk, to rock and pop, Steve shares his enthusiasm for taking the violin well beyond traditional boundaries. Violin - but not as you know it!

Please remember to bring your own instruments

11:40 - 12:20

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